Not Impossible: Adoption Financial Support

Adoption can be expensive. But with the help of employer-provided adoption benefits, federal and state tax credits, subsidies, loans, grants and other help, it can also be possible.

Types of Adoption

The cost of adoption (and the process) depend on the type of adoption. Here are a few of the major types of adoption today:

  • Adoption of a child from foster care
  • Private agency adoption
  • Independent adoption
  • Intercountry adoption

Adoption from foster care is typically the least expensive option because federal and state assistance programs are designed to make it affordable—and to encourage families to adopt. Other types of adoption, especially intercountry adoption, are typically much more expensive.

Adoption Resources

Even so, there are many programs and resources available to adoptive families who need help covering the one-time or recurring expenses of adoption. Here are a few key resources to check out if you are considering adoption and need financial assistance:

These are just a few of the many resources available to adoptive families who need help covering their expenses.

Some businesses have recognized the expenses and needs associated with adoption and have jumped on board to help make adoption easier and more affordable for families. One example is Wendy’s.

More than a Burger: Wendy’s Adoption Advocacy

Wendy’s is famous for its burgers, and maybe even more famous for its snarky, quick-witted Twitter account.

But this global fast-food chain has gone above and beyond the burger and past what’s expected to create an adoption-friendly workplace.

Dave Thomas with foster children [source]
At just six weeks old, Dave Thomas, the found of Wendy’s, was adopted. His upbringing was far from privileged, but he had the love, support, perseverance and resilience to succeed. He became one of the most successful businessmen and philanthropists in American history. Because his own adoption story shaped his life so positively, he made adoption the signature cause of Wendy’s Company.

In 1992, Thomas partnered with the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, promoting adoption-friendly workplaces across the U.S.

Today, Wendy’s helps fundraise for adoption through their national cup promotion—where they feature stories of foster children matched with families and accept donations of spare change at Wendy’s restaurants that go toward adoption advocacy and family support.

Wendy’s work of promoting adoption also extends to supporting social workers and recruiters. In 2005, Wendy’s started hosting the annual Wonderful Kids Summit. This event was an educational three-day conference in D.C. with more than 400 professionals who spend their lives fighting for foster kids. Summits have included presentations from governors, youth and major leaders of the adoption movement.

Wendy’s also takes its corporate social responsibility to its own employees seriously. Whenever a Wendy’s employee adopts one or more children, Wendy’s steps in to help. The company offers paid time off, leave for bonding time with the newly adopted child and financial assistance for every child who is adopted. These adoption-friendly policies improve both the outward image of Wendy’s and the internal work environment.

It takes a…

The saying goes that it takes a village to raise a child. As Wendy’s and other adoption-friendly businesses shown, every adoptive family needs support to adopt and raise a child.

Adoption can be expensive, yes. But it’s not impossible. With the help of the programs listed above—and many others—it is possible. If you’re considering adoption and want to know more about specific support programs in your state or area, please comment below.

 

Featured image: source

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